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Getting Started With HTML5 Game Development
There are plenty of valid ways to create an HTML5 game, and quite a bit of material on the technical aspect of each, so for this article I’ll be giving more of a broad overview of HTML5 game development. How “HTML5” can be better than native, where to start with the development process, where to go when you’re stuck, and how to monetize and distribute games.

Most of the audience here already sees the value in HTML5, but I want to re-iterate why you should be building an HTML5 game. If you are just targeting iOS for your game, write the game in Objective-C, the cons outweigh the benefits in that scenario… but if you want to build a game that works on a multitude of platforms, HTML5 is the way to go.

Cross-Platform
One of the more obvious advantages of HTML5 for games is that the games will work on any modern device. Yes, you will have to put extra thought into how your game will respond to various screen sizes and input types, and yes, you might have to do a bit of ‘personalization’ in the code per platform (the main inhibitor being audio); but it’s far better than the alternative of completely porting the game each time.

I see too many games that don’t work on mobile and tablets, and in most instances that really is a huge mistake to make when developing your game – keep mobile in mind when developing your HTML5 game!

Unique Distribution
Most HTML5 games that have been developed to this point are built in the same manner as Flash and native mobile games. To some extent this makes sense, but what’s overlooked is the actual benefits The Web as a platform adds. It’s like if an iOS developer were to build a game that doesn’t take advantage of how touch is different from a mouse – or if Doodle Jump was built with arrow keys at the bottom of the screen instead of using the device’s accelerator.

It’s so easy to fall into the mindset of doing what has worked in the past, but that stifles innovation. It’s a trap I’ve fallen into – trying to 100% emulate what has been successful on iOS, Android, and Flash – and it wasn’t until chatting with former Mozillian Rob Hawkes before I fully realized it. While emulating what worked in the past is necessary to an extent, The Open Web is a different vehicle for games, and innovation can only happen when taking a risk and trying something new.

Distribution for HTML5 games is often thought of as a weakness, but that’s just because we’ve been looking at it in the same sense as native mobile games, where a marketplace is the only way to find games. With HTML5 games you have the incredible powerful hyperlink. Links can so easily be distributed across the web and mobile devices (think of how many links you click in the Facebook and Twitter apps), and it certainly should not just be limited to the main page for the game. The technology is there to be able to link to your game and do more interesting things like jump to a specific point in a game, try to beat a friend’s score, or play real-time against that friend – use it to your advantage! Take a good look at was has worked for the virality of websites and apply those same principles to your games. Quicker Development Process No waiting for compilation, updates and debugging in real-time, and once the game is done, you can push out the update immediately. Choosing a Game Engine Game engines are just one more level of abstraction that take care of a few of the more tedious tasks of game development. Most take care of asset loading, input, physics, audio, sprite maps and animation, but they vary quite a bit. Some engines are pretty barebones, while some (ImpactJS for example) go as far as including a 2D level editor and debug tools. Decide Whether or Not You Need a Game Engine This is largely a personal decision. Game Engines will almost always reduce the time it takes for you to create a fully-functional game, but I know some folks just like the process of building everything from the ground up so they can better understand every component of the game. For simple games, it really isn’t difficult to build from scratch (assuming you have a JavaScript background and understand how games work). Slime Volley (source) for example was built without having a game engine, and none of the components were rocket science. Of course, Slime Volley is a very basic game, building an RPG from the ground up would likely lead to more hair pulling.
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